Book Review: Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot #10) by Agatha Christie

Murder on the Orient Express (A Hercule Poirot Mystery)

My rating: 5 out of 5 Stars
Received: Own
Publication Date:March 29, 2011
Publisher: HarperCollins
Point of View: Third Person (Hercule Poirot)
Genres & Themes:  Fiction, Mystery, Detective, Suspense, Mystery Thriller

BLURB:

“The murderer is with us–on the train now . . .”

Just after midnight, the famous Orient Express is stopped in its tracks by a snowdrift. By morning, the millionaire Samuel Edward Ratchett lies dead in his compartment, stabbed a dozen times, his door locked from the inside. One of his fellow passengers must be the murderer.

Isolated by the storm, detective Hercule Poirot must find the killer among a dozen of the dead man’s enemies, before the murderer decides to strike again . . .

REVIEW:

A couple of years ago, let’s round it to 7 (because why not, like I’m pretty sure that’s the number), I got stuck on this game. Now, back then I didn’t really read/look for walkthroughs, and so here I am going back and forth to this bees scene and I just can’t get through. So, I found that the most sensible thing to do was just exit out of the game.

For 7 years, naturally. As one does, you know. When one gets stuck in a game.

Fast forward 7 years, my little sister is asking me what this game, And Then There Were None, is about and she asks, “well, did you finish it?” and you could see me looking off into the camera, because girl do I have a story to tell you.

Anyway, the point of me telling you my “gamer story” is because this spurred my Agatha Christie obsession. Naturally, I had to buy another game after finally, FINALLY, completing the game. For my sister’s birthday I bought her Evil Under the Sun, and this nagging of sorts got into me. I just had to know how the books were—were they different? Was it the same? Where they more amazing than the games?

Yes, yes, and yes. Respectively, by the way.

I didn’t know where to begin, and so a fellow coworker suggested going with Murder on the Orient Express. Quickly, I took to buying it and started, and kind of didn’t stop. Agatha Christies’ novels are intriguing, suspenseful, and surprisingly, quick reads.

The reader is sucked into the drama, in a way that is easy to follow along, but follow of twists, lies and surprises. Murder on the Orient Express embodies all of that since the beginning. Everything is clue, and yet the way that Hercule Poirot pieces it all together and gets his little white cells working makes you exclaim, “How did I not think of THAT!”

Setting up the murder, gathering the facts, working the white cells, and then delivering the findings—it’s all such a thrill. It makes you feel part of the murder and the investigation. And the more you try to piece it all together, the more it evades you. That is—until Poirot lays it all before the audience.

“The impossible could not have happened, therefore the impossible must be possible in spite of appearances.”

With MOTOE, I just wanted to know who of the twelve was the culprit, why they did that, and then the ending hits you and you’re not disappointed, but rather it leaves you —

Just like that.

I can’t say for sure where one should begin their Agatha Christie adventure, but I’m not at all disappointed at having begun here. In fact, I’m already picking up my next Hercule Poirot read, and perhaps revisit And Then There Were None.

Do tell me—if you’ve read MOTOE, are you planning on seeing the movie? Does it affect the suspense, when knowing what you know?

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